Monthly Archives: April 2016

Healthy Ways to Handle Rejection

Healthy Ways to Handle Rejection. Episode #17 - Raising Kids Who Can Cope

Episode #17 in the “Raising Kids Who Can Cope” Series

Click arrow to listen to the 90-second podcast.

We all want to raise kids who are emotionally and socially intelligent and are able to recover from disappointment to grow stronger every day into adulthood

Rejection is a part of everyday life. In the adult world, rejection may be as serious as a break up or a missed job opportunity, or it can be as minor as someone disagreeing with our idea. We choose how to handle both small and large rejections, and how we role model our responses sets the tone for our children.

We’ve all seen and recognize unhealthy responses. However, healthy reactions have three main parts. First, it helps to acknowledge our disappointment. Depending on the seriousness of the situation, it may take some time to work through our feelings. This is normal as long as it doesn’t keep us from our daily lives.

Next, evaluate the experience. In some situations, we learn from what happened and improve our performance next time. In others, the other person may simply have been looking for something different than what we had to offer, and it wasn’t about us at all. It is important to recognize the difference between opportunities for growth and experiences to merely put behind us.

Finally, we prepare ourselves to try again whether it’s selling a product, building a relationship, or applying for a job. We learn from the earlier rejection and try again to reach our goals.

Rejection can be a challenge, as well as an opportunity for reflection and growth. The more we model healthy responses, the better lessons our children will learn.

Raising Kids Who Can Cope is a 28-part series developed to build skills, knowledge and awareness in adults who play a role in young people’s lives. It is brought to you by Jackson County UW-Extension and Together for Jackson County Kids. Find out more at Raising Kids Who Can Cope.

References

Ginsburg, K. R. (2011). Building Resiliency in Children and Teens. Grove Village IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Recognizing Feelings

Recognizing Feelings. Episode #16 - Raising Kids Who Can Cope

Episode #16 in the “Raising Kids Who Can Cope” Series

Click arrow to listen to the 90-second podcast.

We all want to raise kids who are emotionally and socially intelligent and are able to recover from disappointment to grow stronger every day into adulthood

Helping your child to recognize and manage their feelings and emotions, is a necessary life skill, which will help them succeed and lead a productive life.

Often, children cannot communicate what they are feeling, which may cause inappropriate behavior or heightened stress in certain situations.  As adults, we understand these feelings, and can show our children how to recognize feelings as they happen, how to express them appropriately, and how to identify emotions in others.  We can also help them be aware of how their emotions affect others, and to become more sensitive to what others need or want.

One way to help your child learn to name what they feel is to create a feelings chart that lists the different emotions that people can have.  Depending on the age of your child, you may want to use pictures to describe the feelings.  For older children, another way you can help them is to create a journal for them, where they can capture feelings, thoughts and moods.  These things give children an outlet or a way to express feelings, and can minimize unnecessary stress.  They also give adults a chance to show children that they understand, tell them that what they are feeling is okay, and to model how they should properly be expressed.

Helping your child learn to recognize and manage their feelings will help them to navigate through life successfully and become a caring, responsible adult.

Raising Kids Who Can Cope is a 28-part series developed to build skills, knowledge and awareness in adults who play a role in young people’s lives. It is brought to you by Jackson County UW-Extension and Together for Jackson County Kids. Find out more at Raising Kids Who Can Cope.

References

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/learning_to_manage_feelings_is_a_life_skill

http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4h/explore/lifeskills

http://www.csrees.usda.gov/nea/family/res/pdfs/Experiential_Learning.pdf

Delaying Gratification in an Instant Age

Delaying Gratification in an Instant Age. Episode #15 - Raising Kids Who Can Cope

Episode #15 in the “Raising Kids Who Can Cope” Series

Click arrow to listen to the 90-second podcast.

We all want to raise kids who are emotionally and socially intelligent and are able to recover from disappointment to grow stronger every day into adulthood

Resilient adults have the ability to delay gratification. Yet, it is in children’s very nature to want to meet needs and wants right away. However, research tells us that children who learn to control themselves and resist temptations are more resilient and successful as adults.

There are lots of ways to encourage self-regulation in children. For example, spending time cooking or baking with children can teach them that sometimes they have to wait for good things. Likewise, teaching children not to interrupt adults lets them know that if they are patient, they will have your undivided attention. Similarly, telling young people “no” when it is appropriate helps them understand they can’t have (nor do they need) everything they want.

By encouraging self-directed play, we allow children to learn how to distract themselves from what they want in the moment. Then, help your child write down a wish list. It tells them you are truly listening to them, they learn to set goals, and it gives them a chance to evaluate what they wanted after some time has passed. Finally, good adult role models can be the best teacher.

By teaching lessons about delayed gratification early in life, children will be better able to manage the demands placed on them through the media, social media and other sources that vie for their attention, and they will be much better prepared to deal with challenges as they get older.

Raising Kids Who Can Cope is a 28-part series developed to build skills, knowledge and awareness in adults who play a role in young people’s lives. It is brought to you by Jackson County UW-Extension and Together for Jackson County Kids. Find out more at Raising Kids Who Can Cope.

References

Ginsburg, K. R. (2011). Building Resiliency in Children and Teens. Grove Village IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Sleeping Should be Easy (2013). How to Promote Delayed Gratification in Children. Retrieved from http://sleepingshouldbeeasy.com/2013/01/17/delayed-gratification/.

Ending the Blame Game: Teaching Children Inner Control

Ending the Blame Game: Teaching Inner Control. Episode #14 - Raising Kids Who Can Cope

Episode #14 in the “Raising Kids Who Can Cope” Series

Click arrow to listen to the 90-second podcast.

We all want to raise kids who are emotionally and socially intelligent and are able to recover from disappointment to grow stronger every day into adulthood

Children learn more from observing parents behavior than from being told how to behave. We have probably heard our child say “it’s not my fault,” when it clearly was, or “it’s because the teacher hates me,” when they come home with a bad grade. We may even scold them for not taking responsibility. However, if we come home and say that it’s everyone else’s fault for the mistake we made at work, or blame everyone in the house if we misplace the keys; what message are we actually sending to our child?

There are a few constructive steps that you go through with your child that can help strengthen their resiliency and ability to recognize their own responsibility for their choices and actions. First listen to your child’s story. How they tell the story of what happened can give you insight as to how they deal with disappointment. Next work together and figure out who actually is responsible for what occurred. Is the child at fault or was the situation completely out of their control? Finally talk about how long the problem will last and if it is just a bump in the road or a serious issue. As adults, this is also a valuable learning process for us to go through with ourselves. .

By modeling effective problem solving in front of your child and guiding them through the process when they face failure, you can help teach your child to become better at coping with disappointment, be better able to skillfully manage other challenges they face in life, and take responsibility for their own choices.

Raising Kids Who Can Cope is a 28-part series developed to build skills, knowledge and awareness in adults who play a role in young people’s lives. It is brought to you by Jackson County UW-Extension and Together for Jackson County Kids. Find out more at Raising Kids Who Can Cope.

References

Ginsburg, K. R. (2011). Building Resiliency in Children and Teens. Grove Village IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.