Strengthening Families Program set to begin in the fall of 2017

Who: Parents or Caregivers and their youth ages 4-14

What: The Strengthening Families Program consists of 12 sessions for ages 4-10 and 7 sessions for ages 11-14, with a free meal before or during each session.
When: One day a week

              Dates: To Be Announced

              5pm-7:30pm each night

Please register ASAP to help us coordinate meals and space.  

Where: To Be Announced

               Benefits:

  • Meet other parents and children from the community.
  • Help participants build on their strengths in showing love and setting limits.
  • Help youth develop skills in handling stress, peer pressure, and building a positive future.
  • Have fun with the family.

Gift basket for each family, family portrait at end of program!!

There is no cost to attend the program and we have many family incentives for attending!!

Child care provided upon request for children ages 3 and under.
To register please contact the Jackson County UW-Extension office at 715-284-4257 (ask for Luane Meyer) or email luane.meyer@co.jackson.wi.us

You can also register via Facebook (Strengthening Families) or at our website www.tfjck.org  (under the Programs tab)

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It’s Okay to Ask for Help

It's Okay to Ask for Help. Episode #28 - Raising Kids Who Can Cope

Episode #28 in the “Raising Kids Who Can Cope” Series

Click arrow to listen to the 90-second podcast.

We all want to raise kids who are emotionally and socially intelligent and are able to recover from disappointment to grow stronger every day into adulthood

Families are going to need some help from time to time.  It can be hard for some people to ask for help. It is important to recognize that asking for help is not a sign of weakness but actually a sign of strength.  Being resilient means being able to recognize a problem, deal with it, and bounce back quickly, sometimes that means asking for help. The more resilient we are we’re better able to deal with bigger problems.

Our social networks are a good place to look for help. Family, friends, neighbors and coworkers all have skills and resources that can be useful.  Some examples might be asking your parents to babysit or asking a coworker who lives near you for a ride to work if your car breaks down. Asking for help to deal with smaller problems can keep them from becoming bigger problems.

If it is a bigger problem we may need to look outside our social network and at resources in our community.  Schools, churches, afterschool programs, and nonprofits are all excellent resources in a community.  Many of them also have connections to other resources that they can direct us to if they aren’t able to help us directly.

Raising Kids Who Can Cope is a 28-part series developed to build skills, knowledge and awareness in adults who play a role in young people’s lives. It is brought to you by Jackson County UW-Extension and Together for Jackson County Kids. Find out more at Raising Kids Who Can Cope.

References

Ginsburg, K. R. (2011). Building Resiliency in Children and Teens. Grove Village IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Strengthening Families Program for Children 11-14 Curriculum. Iowa State University Extension. http://www.extension.iastate.edu/sfp10-14/

Parents Make Mistakes: It’s Okay to Admit You Were Wrong

Parents Make Mistakes: It's Okay to Admit You Were Wrong. Episode #27 - Raising Kids Who Can Cope

Episode #27 in the “Raising Kids Who Can Cope” Series

Click arrow to listen to the 90-second podcast.

We all want to raise kids who are emotionally and socially intelligent and are able to recover from disappointment to grow stronger every day into adulthood

Parents make mistakes. It’s just that simple.  There is no book of answers to questions we have on raising our children, but because we are human, we do have bad days, and yes, we do make mistakes. This doesn’t mean we can’t admit that we were wrong, be willing to grow from the mistake, and do better next time.

Admitting you were wrong, and apologizing for your actions, will not undermine your authority with your child. In fact, apologies can help build a stronger relationship between parents and children.  Apologies help restore good feelings, reduce the resentment your child may feel, and give you a chance to talk to your child about what happened and why it was wrong.  They also teach the child that everyone makes mistakes and how one should behave when they do.

Mistakes teach us lessons and remind us that we are human. Instead of dwelling on a mistake you may have made, you need to push forward and keep trying.  From mistakes we also learn to problem solve and be a better person.  Life is a journey and so is parenting.  As we make mistakes, we become better, wiser and respected by our children for admitting that we did.

Children do not need perfect parents, they need us to model for them how to be gracious humans. It is never too late to recognize mistakes and apologize for your actions.  This can transform your relationship with your child into one with much trust and respect.  As parents, we need to stop being so tough on ourselves for not being the perfect parent (whatever that is).  We need to remember that life happens, and so do mistakes.

Raising Kids Who Can Cope is a 28-part series developed to build skills, knowledge and awareness in adults who play a role in young people’s lives. It is brought to you by Jackson County UW-Extension and Together for Jackson County Kids. Find out more at Raising Kids Who Can Cope.

References

University of Minnesota Extension

Aha! Parenting.com Blog (www.ahaparenting.com)

Grocott, Heather (2014). Parents make mistakes, too. WPRI.com program, aired: April 14, 2014, 11:06 am.

Small Steps to Dealing with Big Transitions

Small Steps to Dealing with Big Transitions. Episode #26 - Raising Kids Who Can Cope

Episode #26 in the “Raising Kids Who Can Cope” Series

Click arrow to listen to the 90-second podcast.

We all want to raise kids who are emotionally and socially intelligent and are able to recover from disappointment to grow stronger every day into adulthood

Transition and change can happen almost daily for our kids. Sometimes the change seems so huge or the goal so difficult to reach that young people feel they can’t even think about trying. This may involve a move for the family, a divorce, death, job loss for parent, a military deployment, or the physical, emotional, and social changes that our youth go through in the pre-teen and teen years.

The first step is to help youth recognize what the current transition or change is that is taking place in their life.  Then together look at the consequences of moving forward by making wise choices versus what might happen if wise choices aren’t made or they would choose to not move forward to make a change.

Next provide guidance as the youth contributes by identifying and dividing the difficult transition into small steps with each step moving closer to a solution. To our youth, the process seems more manageable going one step at a time and when accomplished, they feel that sense of being in control and successful. They also learn that mistakes happen; sometimes they could have prevented them but the next time they will be more prepared for them. Include a timeline of when to have the steps completed as a guide for the youth and the adults.

To support youth through these times, maintain a strong sense of accessibility and security by spending time together and allowing time to adjust to new situations.

Raising Kids Who Can Cope is a 28-part series developed to build skills, knowledge and awareness in adults who play a role in young people’s lives. It is brought to you by Jackson County UW-Extension and Together for Jackson County Kids. Find out more at Raising Kids Who Can Cope.

References

Ginsburg, K. R. (2011).  Building Resiliency in Children and Teens. Grove Village IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Roehlkepartain, Eugene C. www.parentfurther.com, a Search Institute resource for families.